Kicktastic

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Articles from 08/2012

Want to make money freelancing? You have to commit.

Austin Church

by Austin Church


Aug 17, 2012


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If you've read the last two posts, you now know that Kicktastic exists to 1) make solid business training affordable for everyone; and 2) give you the complete elephant and help you make money freelancing or transform your small mature business into a supercharged rocketpack made out of money.

Short answer: The purpose of all the trainging is to help you grow by leaps and bounds and take more cash home.

The first step is mental. You have to lay claim to this adventure of being responsible for your livelihood. Maybe you got laid off and were pushed into the world of self-employment forcibly. Maybe you're fresh out of college and can't find a job in your chosen field. Maybe you already have a decent paycheck and nice enough boss, but the work is sucking out your soul.

Regardless of where you're coming from, you can't ride the employment fence. If part of you is still waiting for another salaried position to fall in your lap, then you won't truly commit to learning for yourself how to generate a sustainable income.

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Kicktastic: Now Serving Fresh, Hot Elephant & Unique Business Ideas

Austin Church

by Austin Church


Aug 17, 2012


Categories

When we left off, I was telling you about the birth of Kicktastic and how I think everyone should be able to afford solid business and marketing advice and have access to unique business ideas. You also need some skin in the game.

Of course, you don't have to venture far on the Internet to find all sorts of training programs and courses and bootcamps and deep-cavity body searches for everything from SEO to personal finance.

So where does Kicktastic fit in?

I'll tell you in a moment, but hang with me for a second as we go on a brief but relevant tangent.

You've probably heard the parable of the blind men and the elephant. It originated in India, and though the number of blind men changes from one version to another, the gist is the same: each man touchs a different part of the elephant—the proboscis, a tusk, a leg, the tuft on the tail. When asked to describe an elephant, each man gives a very different answer: An elephant is like a hairy vine. Or a thick, smooth bone. Or the trunk of a tree.

Yes, I am going somewhere with this.

What does making more money have to do with elephants?

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How to Become a Successful Freelancer – Story of a Reluctant Businessman

Austin Church

by Austin Church


Aug 15, 2012


Categories

After reading and reviewing Chris Guillebeau's latest book, The $100 Startup, I decided to start teaching people about business. This resolution was rather peculiar because I never wanted to be a businessman in the first place.

After getting laid off from a marketing firm in April 2009, I started Bright Newt, and for the past three years, I've been on an enlightening journey of self-employment, helping my clients with brand consulting, marketing strategy, and copywriting business. In 2009 I was able to earn 24% more than if I had kept my salary. In 2010, I made 33% more than in 2009, and in 2011, 47% more than 2010.

I was happy to be making more money, but I didn't understood the significance of these numbers.The few friends who knew about this growth told me that this was abnormal, especially for a guy who has never taken a single business class and who at the time would always reach for The Chronicles of Narnia before Good to Great.

One friend went so far to say that I was "really gifted" at business. Me? Good one!

I stopped laughing when I realized he was serious.

After a good friend lost his house to foreclosure, I started pondering the question in earnest. Why had my income had grown by leaps and bounds? My friend was a gifted designer with a box full of awards. Why had his business struggled?

What happened?

Business is not a meritocracy, and just being better at what you do isn't enough to pay your bills and create your desired lifestyle. My friend "Bob" never made the transition from artist to businessman. He made eye-catching logos but had trouble saying no to pushy clients. He did the work, but he didn't build the business.

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